Usain Bolt’s racing workers break the record for fast running

Srinivasa Gowda, a construction worker in southern India, has just broken the local buffalo race record and is being compared to “Black Lightning” Usain Bolt.

India has an equally thrilling sports. The “Jallikattu” domestication festival is celebrated every week in the state of Tamil Nadu (southern India). Gaur is released into the crowd. Participants will seek to ride and tame the aggressive bull.

This sport has long been an important part of Indian people’s culture. However, this famous festival has also caused many players from head to head to death. Hundreds of players and spectators were trampled, even knocked to death in the matches.

Gowda, 28, finished first in the Kambala buffalo race in Aikala district, Karnataka state, southern India, on February 1. He ran 142 meters of dirt road for 13.42 seconds, BBC reported.

This achievement immediately attracted attention on social networks because if specific, Gowda running 100 meters only takes 9.55 seconds. The current world record for running 100 meters is 9.58 seconds, set by Usain Bolt, the runners of Jamaica.

Gowda, from Dakshina Kannada district, Karnataka state, is a part-time construction worker. He was excited to have broken the Kambala record after participating in the sport for seven years.

Kambala, in Tulu meaning “mud field”, is a traditional sport originating from the coastal region of Karnataka. Participants will run on a dirt road, 132 meters long or 142 meters long, with two buffaloes tied together.

Kambala is controversial and has been strongly criticized by animal rights groups.

In 2014, the Supreme Court of India banned the racing of cattle after appearing in several campaigns against Jallikattu, a form of bullfighting in the state of Tamil Nadu. Two years later, the Karnataka state court temporarily banned all Kambala events.

According to Mr. Kadamba, the organizers have adjusted the form of competition to be more humane. Participants learned how to get used to buffaloes without necessarily hurting the animals. In 2018, Karnataka allowed the Kambala organization to come back but added rules, including not using whips.

This sport once again faces the risk of disappearing. The International Animal Rights Protection Organization (PETA) has filed a petition with the Supreme Court of India, saying that the state of Karnataka reorganizing Kambala is illegal.