Indian female wrestler and the war overcome the prejudice (Part 2)

Kakran is the team leader and training instructor. Sister Megha, 17, and Geetanjali Luckad, 18, used to hoe the land, water and smooth the field to prepare for the practice. Geetanjali Luckad’s neck is a round, heavy stone, a way for her to endure.

A group of young men passed by and giggled when they saw the girls. “I don’t care about being looked down upon by men. I will make them shut up on the ring, ”Kakran said with a smile.

As a veteran wrestler, Kakran began practicing at age 6. Since there were no other female wrestlers at the time, she was forced to wrestle with her son.

“They don’t want to play with me because they know they will lose and so shame,” Kakran recalls. Some men bet her, so she can make money back to her family.

Even so, Kakran still couldn’t easily convince his parents to pursue a passion for wrestling. Today, many kushti coaches still refuse to train women.

“We are not just fighting against the opponent. We also fight with billions of Indians who don’t want to see us wrestling”, she said.

Kakran admits the most painful protest comes from her own family. “My parents didn’t support me in the first place,” she said, emphasizing that her father was also a wrestler.

“Many people don’t understand why we don’t marry and give birth, what they call a normal life,” she said.

Worried about not getting married

Luckily for the female wrestlers, Bollywood film Dangal (2016) starring actor Aamir Khan, recounted the true story of the Phogat sisters, who were their father, an amateur wrestler, Train to become world-class wrestlers. The film’s great success has contributed to changing prejudices about Indian female wrestlers.

“We started practicing four years ago, despite parents’ protests,” Geetanjali Luckad tells of his step into the kushti world. “We want to be like Divya, the female wrestler has won a lot of medals,” she said.

“Boys often laugh at us because we wear sportswear and have short hair. My mother is worried that we will never get married but I think women should be free to do what they believe”, she said.

Even getting people’s approval is not enough for Luckad sisters to turn their dreams into reality. “You have to work hard while going to school and doing housework is not easy,” said wrestler Neha Kumari, 20.

However, Kumari affirmed that the biggest challenge for female wrestlers is social prejudice. “India is still one

Indian female wrestler and the war overcome the prejudice (Part 1)

Wearing sportswear and short hair like a son, Indian female wrestlers are often laughed at by men and parents object. Even so, they persist in pursuing passion.

The narrow street of Delhi is still dark on a cold winter morning. Some of the city’s poorest residents curled up in thin blankets and slept on the sidewalk with goats eating trash and wild dogs. Even hot masala tea shops are not open. The crowded capital of India is still silent before dawn.

A group of young girls in sports suits appeared from the fog. They try to speak small but sometimes can’t stop the laughter. This is their favorite time of day.

They went towards a creature, called akhara, a word derived from Sanskrit. Some believe that the ancient form of kushti wrestling is practiced here as the ancestors of all forms of wrestling in the world.

Traditionally, the akhara square is the only playground for men. “Women are not only unable to practice but are not allowed to watch the tournaments in the countryside,” journalist Deepak Ansuia Prasad, a former wrestler, told the South China Morning Post.

Convex-concave, deformed ears

However, time is gradually changing that. Girls in Delhi today are like many other places in the country that are bound by this tradition struggling for equality. The youngest member of the group is only 12 years old. I proudly show off my convex and deformed ears.

“Many people say it is ugly but it proves that I can fight hard because only wrestlers have ears like that,” she said.

Before entering the training room to start training, the girls bowed to the colorful statue of Hanuman, the monkey-faced Hindu god worshiped by Indian wrestlers.

The oldest member, Divya Kakran, has just turned 19. She is the third Indian to win a silver medal at the Asian Wrestling Tournament. More than 40 other medals are decorated in her simple home not far from the gym.

Mud wrestler Kushti of India: Fasting, suffering to change life (part 2)

At the age of 18, Patil left his village to train in akhara on the way to Arthur in Mumbai. Life in akhara must follow the regime. Drinking, smoking and sometimes, sex are also prohibited on the path to purity, physical beauty, and health. Inside the shabby building is the aura of hardship and dedication. All the chaos of division in Indian society is left outside the door. “Here, no one cares whether you are a Hindu or a Muslim or what class you belong to. If there is anything to worship, that’s the body,” Patil said.

Floors are prepared according to a special formula for centuries including mud water, red soil, dairy, and oil. All mixed up into a thick, soft thing like red yellow crumbs. On it, wrestlers perform exercises. They practiced hanging people on ropes, squeezing, yoga and lifting weights or stones. Patil’s proudest achievement is the gold medal at the 2015 national level tournament. This event disturbs his peaceful village. However, Kushti wrestlers do not dream too much about medals and international tournaments. They bring their worldly dreams that success with Kushti will help them get a job in government.

The Indian government spends certain jobs for those who have made a mark in sports. This is an effort to encourage the development of athletic capacity with financial promise. This does not mean that Kushti wrestlers are fully assured of work. Patil is a graduate student in science but is working as a security guard. You are trying to achieve something better.

The work made Patil only able to train in the early morning and late evening. He loved Kushti but was also aware that Kushti was dying all over India. Kushti is gradually being replaced by more contemporary wrestling forms. “I am very happy that I can do what my father and grandfather cannot do just because they were poor.”